Archive for February, 2012

Recycled Leather Earrings

An old leather purse of mine came apart at the seams, so I decided to save the leather for who-knows-what.  I eventually came up with an easy pair of earrings.

Materials

  • leather scraps
  • an x-acto knife and cutting mats
  • jewelry glue
  • gold-filled glue-on earring posts

  • gold acrylic paint
  •  a small spray bottle (travel size is perfect)
  • a cardboard box or piece of poster board for spray painting
The Method

1) Cut four strips of leather, one long pair and one shorter pair.  The shorter pair will be in front, so pick which side you would like to face outwards.  I liked the seude-looking side of my leather.

2) Put some gold paint in your spray bottle and thin it with a little water so you can spray without clogging the nozzle.

3) Spray some gold splatters on the shorter strips of leather.  My favorite technique:  Put the strips inside a cardboard box and direct the spray at an inside wall of the box (instead of spraying the leather directly).  The back-splatter created by spraying the side of the box makes nice splatters on the leather.  Allow to dry completely.

4) Glue the top of the short strip to the top of the long strip.  Glue the ear post to the back of the long strip.

5) Let dry. Done!

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Ikebana, Part 2

Sometimes a little flower arranging counts when there’s not enough time for crafts.

See also: Things I Can’t Make: Ichibana Vase by Don Lawson + Tiny Stencil Tutorial.

Happy Valentine’s Day!: The Lace Dress Tutorial

Last spring I made this lace dress after seeing a little girl’s version in this tutorial on Project Run and Play.  I thought it would be the perfect project to share with you on Valentine’s Day.

It was definitely one of the most time consuming sewing projects I’ve embarked on.   The trip to the fabric store was an endeavor in itself.  I purchased:

  • somewhere between 20 and 30 yards of white and ivory laces of different patterns and widths
  • Red RIT dye
  • cotton muslin to make a lining
  • bias tape for the neck and arm-holes

When I got home, I laid out all my strips lace on my work table in a giant rectangle.  Then I sewed each strip together with a zig-zag stitch.  When I had attached all the laces to one another, I used RIT to dye the lace and my cotton muslin red.  The best part of the dyeing process is that each lace (being of different fabrici content) takes up the dye differently.

Then cut the muslin lining into a front and back piece for my dress.  I sewed these together and tried it on, just to make sure I wouldn’t mess up my lace fabric.  It fit!  So I used a seam ripper to take the pieces apart again.  I laid the muslin over the lace and cut two pieces of lace to fit my pattern.  And finally, I sewed them together to make my dress, adding bias tape to the sleeves and neckline.  This dress took a lot of work, but the end result is one of a kind!